Brexit

Brexit

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 If the EU's withdrawal from the EU means that all citizens of the UK will be excluded from the Single Market, then all people from EU states will be required to leave the EU. This means that at a minimum, all citizens of the EU state will be able to enter the UK without the need for a visa. This could even happen when the UK does not yet have access to the Single Market: in the early stages of the negotiations UK citizens may be excluded by some EU institutions.

If the EU's withdrawal from the EU means that all citizens of the UK will be excluded from the Single Market, then all citizens of the EU state will be forced to leave the UK. This means that at a minimum, all citizens of the EU state will be required to leave the EU. This could even happen when the UK does not yet have access to the Single Market: in the early stages of the negotiations UK citizens will be excluded by some EU institutions. If the same policy applies to immigration, the EU will also not allow asylum. Immigration from the EU means that EU citizens will be subjected to a number of restrictions, including requiring their citizenship to be changed from one nationality to another, requiring full disclosure by the authorities of their nationality at the time of departure but no longer having to submit to a passport and must make a public report of their citizenship and any reasons for having so changed at the time of departure (or their return to the EU is blocked and will not be considered for removal) and requiring them to return home for five or six months, under Article 50 (and in case of permanent residence) for all EU citizens. EU citizens can also be subject to these restrictions at the time of departure, which is a good thing in some cases: for example EU citizens in the UK of legal permanent residence could enter only if they are living in the EU state of residence for one year and for four years each, as in the following scenarios.

EU citizens can also be subject to these restrictions at the time of departure, which is a good thing in some cases: for example EU citizens in the UK of legal permanent residence could enter only if they are living in the EU state of residence for one year and for four years each, as in the following scenarios. If the EU's exit means that Britain has only been allowed to enter the UK for a limited period, then EU citizens can be entitled to apply for British citizenship and a passport. This is because there is no single State to which citizens could apply for this right in the UK, and the European Court of Justice in Brussels has ruled that this is not appropriate because of the "right of Member State to access the EU market and/or the single market for citizens of the Member State concerned" (CFRJ 2002/12/9, p. 11), or because a law has been passed requiring that nationals of a group of countries have to show them the same right and have to show their claim to this right by having to pay special taxes on their purchases and claiming their rights as citizens: see Article 29 in the Treaty of Lisbon and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (1991/477/EC, p. 11).

If the EU's exit means that Britain has only been allowed to enter the UK for a limited period, then EU citizens can be entitled to apply for British citizenship and a passport. This is because there is no single State to which citizens could apply for this right in the UK, and the European Court of Justice in Brussels has ruled that this is not appropriate because of the "right of Member State to access the EU market and/or the single market for citizens of the Member State concerned" (CFRJ 2002/12/9, p. 11). If the UK doesn't want to leave the EU,

 It means a referendum on the EU by 2017, without any change in the way it's handled in Brussels, for people to vote on who to let in and whether they actually do or don't want this country back in the EU. The referendum result has now been declared by the Scottish Parliament and in the process will then be declared by the European Court of Justice," she said.

The Scottish government is expected to present its view to Cameron in Brussels by the autumn of this year.

A Downing Street source said: "The Government of the day is prepared to see the UK as an independent independent state, which should not have a single decision on which of three different EU regions it wants to maintain. All parties involved, including the Government of the day, have a view that the UK should remain outside of the European Union and in the Customs Union as part of an orderly transition to a more stable and prosperous future for Scotland and Northern Ireland. The Brexit process, on every side, was the right decision for Scotland when I first started out as Minister of State.

"A number of EU leaders have now been consulted by the Government on EU trade negotiations. Any agreement in place with the EU that does not support Scottish independence would be binding on the UK. There is no doubt that the UK will not agree with the Government or its position in leaving the customs union. Scotland and Northern Ireland will continue to have their own and independent customs and border services, even if the same services are excluded. Both Scotland and Northern Ireland have different obligations under EU legislation.

"We also will not be part of the customs union. We will not accept the Scottish border control system. We will remain in the customs union, but without an EU system we will not be able to do so."

David Cameron's first interview since leaving office on Thursday was with EU ministers in Brussels. He will be making it clear a further agreement must be reached with the Government, including a deal on how to create a single status for Scotland before the end of 2020, after Scotland left the EU. It will, in effect, come as a major relief for Nicola Sturgeon.

Theresa May has been in Brussels before the referendum and while a majority of Scots support Brexit, some are unhappy that the Government of the day has been unable to agree on one of the key demands of the new British government, a future membership of the EU.

Slovenia and Northern Ireland, among other regions voted to leave the EU in June's referendum, are being asked to give advice to Scottish authorities on how to manage Scotland's economy in light of the UK's departure from the EU.

Speaking in Brussels on Wednesday, the British government's acting Home secretary, Sajid Javid, said he was confident the Government of the day could present a coherent statement of its position on Scottish independence.

"I think it very much is fair to say that we will give further advice to Northern Ireland as to the best course of things," he said.

"They have made clear that they would not support a referendum on Scottish unification."

The government also welcomed the SNP manifesto pledge to support for any Scottish independence without the threat of another independence vote in a leadership election, saying: "The British Government and the SNP should be open and honest with Northern Ireland, both in the UK and internationally."

Mr Javid added: "The government of the day strongly believes the UK would not want to stay within the customs union even after Scotland had the right to stay."

He called on both Westminster leaders to "take on Scotland, which was elected on the promises made in the referendum, in their own hands."

The Scottish Government is due to make a decision on whether it is ready to allow Northern

 

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